Parents: Help Your Student Level Up

Your son or daughter may be getting an education in engineering, business or another field he or she is passionate about. Unfortunately, your student won't be taking courses in how to use that education to land a job. Conducting a successful job search and interview is not intuitive; it requires the same hard work and effort as any other course of study. While most schools provide a Career Services Office, students usually find the office overworked, undestaffed, and unable to provide the level of personal attention they need.  With these limited available resources, your student is poised to launch his or her post-college life with a degree but not the skill set to capitalize on it.

"Tami Campbell's Level Up Services were outstanding. My son gained so much insight, experience, and confidence working with Tami. I was also pleasantly surprised with the very reasonable cost of her services. He utilized the resume help and interview coaching. She spent a lot of time with my son in person, and also on preparations and resume revisions at her office. He felt very comfortable working with her. Yet, she did not hesitate to let him know where and how he needs to improve. Thank you Tami. The help you provided was much more than I had expected !"

- Mike, Central Michigan University Parent

WHAT YOU CAN DO

1. ENCOURAGE YOUR STUDENT TO START THE JOB SEARCH PROCESS AS SOON AS POSSIBLE

Ask career counselors and they will all tell you the same thing: The biggest mistake students make in career preparation is starting too late. 

 

Ideally, students should begin preparing for their careers in their freshman year. However, most first-year students have very little real-world work experience. Taking a blank piece of paper and turning it into a marketing document that highlights their potential value to an employer feels overwhelming to students and they tend to avoid it. Unfortunately, procrastinating can have long-term consequences. This is where I can help. I will meet with your student and work with him or her to uncover hidden accomplishments and highlight areas of strength that employers will be looking for in their candidates. 

If your student is already in his/her senior year and has not done much in terms of career preparation, there is still time to help. Recruiters arrive on campus starting in late September and are ready to make offers.  Make sure your student is ready with 1) an up-to-date resume that shows employers the value he/she can add to an organization, and 2) polished interviewing skills. I can help your student with this process; click here for more details.

2. ADVISE YOUR STUDENT TO SHARPEN HIS/HER INTERVIEWING SKILLS

I’ve conducted hundreds of interviews with students. One observation has remained constant throughout my years of interviewing: Students with poor interview skills don’t get job offers. Period.

 

It never ceases to amaze me how students can work so hard in their school “career”, be extraordinarily accomplished, and then completely bomb an interview. I’ve conducted countless interviews with students who were a fantastic find on paper.  However, once we were in an interview, all those seemingly wonderful skills and experiences meant very little because the students were unable to convey their value to me.  

 

There is an obvious difference between students who come to an interview thinking they can just “wing it” and those who research, practice and prepare: the latter get job offers, the former do not. Don’t let your student spend four years and tens of thousands of dollars only to get stuck at this point! I can help. Interviewing is a skill that can be learned like any other, but it takes time and practice – and a good coach. Click here for more details.